September22014
nprcodeswitch:

Native American Artists Reclaim Images That Represent Them
There’s been a lot of discussion about the name of a certain Washington football team — withlawsuits arguing that it is disparaging, and media outlets choosing not to use it in their content.
But while the debates around the language are raging, the logo — also a part of the trademark lawsuit — remains emblazoned on hats, T-shirts, and picnic blankets around the capital.
The logo has been the team’s brand ambassador for a long time and this team isn’t the only sports team to use Native American imagery. It’s also not something that is exclusive to sports teams; caricatures and motifs depicting indigenous people have long been used to sell stuff — cigars for one, but also things like chewing gum and butter.
But there is another body of artwork out there — produced by Native American artists and entrepreneurs — that asserts ownership over the images associated with their culture. Their work counters the existing “non-Native” representations, questions these portrayals and provides new context.
Photo Credit: Sarah Sense

nprcodeswitch:

Native American Artists Reclaim Images That Represent Them

There’s been a lot of discussion about the name of a certain Washington football team — withlawsuits arguing that it is disparaging, and media outlets choosing not to use it in their content.

But while the debates around the language are raging, the logo — also a part of the trademark lawsuit — remains emblazoned on hats, T-shirts, and picnic blankets around the capital.

The logo has been the team’s brand ambassador for a long time and this team isn’t the only sports team to use Native American imagery. It’s also not something that is exclusive to sports teams; caricatures and motifs depicting indigenous people have long been used to sell stuff — cigars for one, but also things like chewing gum and butter.

But there is another body of artwork out there — produced by Native American artists and entrepreneurs — that asserts ownership over the images associated with their culture. Their work counters the existing “non-Native” representations, questions these portrayals and provides new context.

Photo Credit: Sarah Sense

(via npr)

8PM

haleycomet:

i literally never get tired of this post

(Source: yeah-yougotme, via yayfeminism)

September12014
humansofnewyork:



"My mother and I did not have a good relationship, but we grew much closer after my daughter was born. Because I had no idea what I was doing. When the baby was born three months early, my mom slept at the hospital with her."(Kampala, Uganda)




I miss Uganda so much

humansofnewyork:

"My mother and I did not have a good relationship, but we grew much closer after my daughter was born. Because I had no idea what I was doing. When the baby was born three months early, my mom slept at the hospital with her."

(Kampala, Uganda)

I miss Uganda so much

(via georgetakei)

August262014
gif on lopp foreverrr

gif on lopp foreverrr

(Source: honeybeys, via cafairchild)

August252014
“I am a feminist. I’ve been female for a long time now. I’d be stupid not to be on my own side.” Maya Angelou (via robert-winchester-novak)

(via yayfeminism)

11PM
“Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night.”

Sylvia Plath

fuck every single time that last line gets quoted without the rest

(via sadjailbait)

(Source: raccoonwounds, via reasonsforfeminism)

11PM
justbeingnamaste:

“Although I am a typical loner in my daily life, my awareness of belonging to the invisible community of those who strive for truth, beauty, and justice has prevented me from feelings of isolation.”  

justbeingnamaste:

“Although I am a typical loner in my daily life, my awareness of belonging to the invisible community of those who strive for truth, beauty, and justice has prevented me from feelings of isolation.”
 

(via looksomewhereelse)

August212014
11PM
smartgirlsattheparty:

thedailyshow:

Extended Interview: Malala Yousafzai http://on.cc.com/XD2HLh #BackToSchool

We LOVE this Smart Girl!

smartgirlsattheparty:

thedailyshow:

Extended Interview: Malala Yousafzai http://on.cc.com/XD2HLh #BackToSchool

We LOVE this Smart Girl!

August202014
humansofnewyork:

"We don’t like pictures like this. It is not good to deduce an entire country to the image of a person reaching out for food. It is not good for people to see us like this, and it is not good for us to see ourselves like this. This gives us no dignity. We don’t want to be shown as a country of people waiting for someone to bring us food. Congo has an incredible amount of farmland. An incredible amount of resources. Yes, we have a lot of problems. But food is not what we are reaching for. We need investment. We need the means to develop ourselves." 
(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

THIS IS IMPORTANT.

humansofnewyork:

"We don’t like pictures like this. It is not good to deduce an entire country to the image of a person reaching out for food. It is not good for people to see us like this, and it is not good for us to see ourselves like this. This gives us no dignity. We don’t want to be shown as a country of people waiting for someone to bring us food. Congo has an incredible amount of farmland. An incredible amount of resources. Yes, we have a lot of problems. But food is not what we are reaching for. We need investment. We need the means to develop ourselves." 

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

THIS IS IMPORTANT.

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